Mission 2.5
USED TO/BE USED TO
Compare these examples:

I used to get up early. = I usually got up early but I don't anymore.
I am used to getting up early. = I am in the habit of getting up early.
I will get used to getting up early. = I will get into the habit of getting up early.
Read on for details.
1.
WHAT IT MEANS?

It means it was the case in the past but not anymore. Almost like the past simple but with the emphasis on "not anymore".

used to V

I used to read a lot. – I read a lot in the past but I don't anymore.

They used to live in Russia. – They live in Zimbabwe now.

She used to be quite impatient. – She isn't impatient anymore.

HOW DO YOU FORM QUESTIONS AND NEGATIVES?

Imagine that used here is merely the past form of use.
2.
He USED a pen. → DID he USE a pen? → He DIDN'T USE a pen.

He USED to get up early. → DID he USE to get up early? → He DIDN'T USE to get up early.

Quite by accident, used could also be an adjective followed by the preposition to, which means 'accustomed to'.

In this event, we'll have to add BE or GET before it and put the verb into the -ING form:
3.
I am used to reading a lot. – I am accustomed to reading / am in the habit of reading a lot.

I got used to reading a lot. – I became accustomed to reading / got into in the habit of reading a lot.


They are used to living in Russia. – They are accustomed to living in Russia.

They will get used to living in Russia. – They will become accustomed to living in Russia.


She is used to being quite impatient. – She is in the habit of being quite impatient.

She is getting used to being quite impatient. – She is becoming accustomed to being quite impatient.
NB!
WHY -ING?

Here this form has nothing to do with the Continuous. It's called the 'gerund', which is very much like an abstract noun:

be/get used to Ving

smoking – the action of sb smoking
swimmingthe action of sb swimming
understanding
the act of sb understanding
And now examples:
Over to you
Now test yourself.
USED TO
Start quiz
Did you use to go out with Chris?
That's right.
Not really.
No, that's the present tense.
You don't need 'use' here.
Next
Check
Show result
Did you use to read comics?
Nope.
You used what?
Perfect!
Why he?
Next
Check
Show result
Brazil _________ the World Cup in 1998.
Come on, it's about a single occasion!
You're God damn right!
No Present Perfect for past events.
You need to use a different form.
Next
Check
Show result
I _________ get up early, because I have to be at work by 7.30.
Wrong. It's about the present.
It's correct.
Makes no sense.
You don't need an irrelevant auxiliary here.
Next
Check
Show result
Sam _________ work in a large office in Moscow.
That doesn't make sense.
Of course not.
Not really, no.
Oh yes!
Next
Check
Show result
Are you sure you've read the text above?
Do it over ASAP.
Restart
Not so bad.
But not so good either.
Restart
We are proud of you.
But there's still room for improvement.
Restart
Excellent!
Keep it up, soldier!
Restart
УЧЕНИЯ
'What's your name?' 'David.'
'Are you married?' 'No, I'm not.'
'How old are you?' '25.'
'Are you a student?' 'Yes, I am.'
'Am I late?' 'No, you're on time.'
'Is your mother at home?' 'No, she's out.'
'Are your parents at home?' 'No, they're out.'
'Is it cold in your room?' 'Yes, a little.'
Your shoes are nice. Are they new?
Is she at home? / Is your mother at home?
Are they new? / Are your shoes new?
Let's do some training.
Here's the package for you to deliver:
FIELD PRACTICE